Guns, Pistol, Handguns, Self-Defense, Firearms, Gun training, Damsel in Defense, stun guns, pepper spray, women's handgun and self defense fundamentals, gun training, pistol training, firearms training, CCW, Concealed Weapons Permit, Women's Shooting League, Women's Only Firearms Training, Shooting, Targets, Bullets, Glocks, USCCA, NRA, Co-Ed Firearms Training, SafetyGuns, Pistol, Handguns, Self-Defense, Firearms, Gun training, Damsel in Defense, stun guns, pepper spray, women's handgun and self defense fundamentals, gun training, pistol training, firearms training, CCW, Concealed Weapons Permit, Women's Shooting League, Women's Only Firearms Training, Shooting, Targets, Bullets, Glocks, USCCA, NRA, Co-Ed Firearms Training, Safety

WEB-SITE

DIRECTORY

USCCA Instructor # 1685126

NRA Instructor # 129738643

UTAH Concealed Firearm

Instructor # I168491

  Design Your Firearm

Training Class

***‚Äč**

 Sandy Evers

Your Firearms Trainer

*****

Allow me to design a specialized class for you

*****

Training You So You 

Can Be Safe

*****

Contact Sandy via the Contact Box Below Today!

Specializing in Ladies Handgun and 

Self-Defense Fundamentals


TRAUMATIC EMERGENCIES

Field treatment For Severe Bleeding, Sucking Chest Wound and More



MEDICAL EMERGENCIES

Assessing and Treating Cardiac Emergencies, Environmental Emergencies, and More


Build Your Own Kit

Create Your Own 

Small

Medium 

and Large

Emergency First Aid Kit

Assessing The Situation

A common thread exists in all "first responder" education, regardless of whether that education is for police officers, firefighters, paramedics, or EMTs, and that's that learning to "assess" a situation is at the top of the list of things to learn.

Assessing things like the safety of the scene, the seriousness of the situation, understanding the need for additional help, and understanding the risks to the rescuer's personal safety, are all things drummed into the heads of these men and women.

Committing this checklist to memory can help calm you during what might be a very chaotic scene, and can lead to a better outcome for the patient.

Assessment Checklist

  • Determine scene safety.
  • Determine the need for additional resources, including 911, or dispatching someone to seek additional "manpower" resources.
  • Develop a general impression of the patient and of the situation.
  • Determine the patient's mental status.
  • Assess and treat any immediate life threats.
  • For trauma patients, assess the need for spinal immobilization.
  • Assess the patient's airway.
  • Assess the patent's breathing rate and quality.
  • Assess the patient's circulation including pulse, and skin color, temperature, and condition.

Determine Scene Safety

Something that all first responders learn on day one is that their number one responsibility is for their own personal safety.


That has to do with more than the police, fire, and EMS departments wanting their employees to make it home safe at night. It's because the risk to rescuers dramatically increases based upon the number of victims needing rescue.


If a potential rescuer runs headlong into a situation that wasn't safe, the risk becoming a victim themselves, also requiring rescue, and putting subsequent rescuers at greater risk





Scene safety also means more than just safety to the rescuers, it must also be a measurement of whether the scene constitutes a further risk to the patient.


That risk to patient safety may cause you to reorder priorities on the remainder of the assessment list.


In the Emergency First-Aid fundamentals Class, we demonstrate (and you get a chance to practice) several emergency moves that might be required if the scene constitutes a further risk to the patient.

Determine the Need for Additional Resources

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Lesson 5

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